The loss of innocence in the novel the catcher in the rye

Literary Terms Themes in Salinger's The Catcher in the Rye The Catcher in the Rye by JD Salinger is one and only novel by the great author in which he embedded many themes that would help us to understand the characters and their worlds.

The loss of innocence in the novel the catcher in the rye

There is evidence that Holden exhibits much of the same "phoniness" he denounces in others.

Innocence In Catcher In The Rye In the book there is a plethora of falling images. The very title is about Holden wanting to “catch” little kids from falling off a cliff. In the novel The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger, the general theme is the loss of innocence in the process of maturity, and that the desire to protect the true innocence is found in everyone. However, it is no use to do so as it is only natural to grow up. The narrator of The Catcher in the Rye is an adolescent obsessed with saving children from the dirtiness he sees in the adult world. The novel deals with innocence in .

Holden also puts on pretenses, lies, and makes irrational and contradictory assumptions to mask his feelings and actions from others, which further alienates him from society.

However, many others say that this is a misinterpretation of Holden's use of "phoniness", and that while he lies and exhibits other flaws, he doesn't fall into his own category.

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Possibly, the "phoniness" is about not being honest with yourself about your feelings of pain and disappointment. Holden's "phonies" rarely give the impression of admitting their flaws and insecurities, and this could be what he has in mind when he labels them as such.

In contrast, though Holden labels other people as "phonies," Holden reveals much of his own carnality, showing himself to the readers as being self-righteous, judgmental, and unloving.

Either way, Holden believes that he is honest with himself, and the reader, throughout the book. Holden's idea of a "catcher in the rye" illustrates how he wishes to wipe out corruption from the world and protect children like his sister from becoming like the many "phonies" he hated, i.

The loss of innocence in the novel the catcher in the rye

This is clearly illustrated by Holden's attack on Stradlater after the date with Jane Gallagher. The fact that Jane always kept her kings in the back row during a game of checkers was significant to Holden because he wanted her to protect her virginity.

However, Holden finds it impossible to maintain innocence. After seeing some vulgar graffiti on the walls in his sister Phoebe's elementary school and the museum, bastions of learning and culture, he realizes that he won't be able to erase it all and protect children from the world indefinitely.

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Throughout the story Holden tries to maintain the innocence of anything possible. I started to throw it. At a car that was parked across the street.

But I changed my mind. The car looked so nice and white. Then I started to throw it at a hydrant, but that looked too nice and white, too. Holden decides not to throw it because he attempts to preserve that purity they both have and puts the snowball down.

To Holden they represent the things that remove the innocence of people like his sister Phoebe. Holden believes that society will never get better, and it will always have some sort of flaw. He is immensely frustrated by his repeated attempts to fit into adult society, foiled by his saying something wrong, or simply being seen as an adolescent by the adults around him.

Having been rejected, Holden's response is an even stronger rejection of the people with whom he was trying to fit in. This resentment, combined with his observations of "phoniness" in many of the people around him, cause him to be repelled by adult society and to sometimes view himself as a loner with outsider status.

Innocence in Catcher in the Rye - Book/Movie Report

Holden also changes his mind at the end of the book when he lets Phoebe grow up. Holden has failed out of quite a few schools in his career, and exhibits no signs of remorse or promise of change.In the novel The Catcher in the Rye by J.D.

Salinger, the general theme is the loss of innocence in the process of maturity, and that the desire to protect the true innocence is found in everyone. However, it is no use to do so as it is only natural to grow up.

The novel The Catcher in the Rye, his best-known book, was an immediate success and remains popular and controversial. Salinger followed Catcher with Nine Stories, Franny and Zooey, and Raise High the Roof Beam, Carpenters and Seymour: An Introduction/5(K).

Holden and Gene: Compare The Catcher in the Rye with another novel or poem or piece of literature that describes the loss of innocence and the attainment of maturity. Compare and contrast the protagonist found in it and Holden Caufield.

Explain which piece presents the most convincing picture of growing up. The Corruption of Innocence It has struck some leaving a lasting impact while others just let it go by.

Some would see it as corruption, and others see everyday life. I see it as the pure loss of innocence in a world of corruption. For instance, in "The Catcher in the Rye," a classic coming-of-age novel, the protagonist Holden Caulfield is in the midst of losing his innocence.

He has been expelled from four schools, he sees most people as "phonies," and he . Each day, someone loses his or her innocence due to a seminal moment that changes his or her life forever. This concept of lost innocence is represented in both the novel The Catcher in the Rye and.

Catcher In the Rye, Symbolism and Quotes? | Yahoo Answers